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Thread: How To Teach Your Child About Good Behaviour?

  1. #1

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    I am father of 2 years old boy. he is very short tempered and gets angry at every little thing. I don't know how to make him behave properly

    please suggest some ideas :-S



  2. #2
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    Apr 2009
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    Hi VS,

    Dont worry, he needs a little more attention and love. AS he is still a child, pamper him and slowly he would turn around and listen to you and your wife. Harshness and firmness will not work at this stage as he wont understand. But he will know love and affection and respond immediately.

    Go through the below link for more info and advice on how to manage children .

    [url]http://www.indiaparenting.com/mannersdiscipline/index.shtml[/url]

    Sanjay



    VS wrote:

    > I am father of 2 years old boy. he is very short tempered and gets angry at every little thing. I don't know how to make him behave properly

    please suggest some ideas :-S

  3. #3

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    VS i m very shocked yaar..u r expecting gud behaviour from ur 2 yr old baby.. he is too young to learn such attiquets and he himseld doesnt wht he is doing. Moreover, when he will be school going he would automatically learn all things. let him enjoy his childhood properly by doing such mischievousness otherwise next post will be posted by him that my dad is very bad he doesnt let me do enjoy my life as m very small baby... VS hope u wont mind my words...

  4. #4
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    Sanjay -->> jai ho.......... (Y)

    Jaanvi > gud............ :lol:

  5. #5

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    I have a two year old, and completely understand what you mean. With no offense to anyone on this site, I defer that 2 year olds are babies and do not understand what discipline means. Kids are much smarter than what we think they are.

    In my case, when my child throws tantrums, I let her do that without showing any signs that her behavior is affecting me or is stressing me out. I just remain calm and watch her behavior. She calms down after a while, (sometimes after quite a while). Then I talk to her, what made her behave the way she did. I try to put words in her mouth, for eg, you did not like this, or you wanted this etc. I think embracing at the time when she is throwing tantrums is rewarding negative behavior. So I donít do that but just watch her. Also I donít leave the room, as that might make her feel abandoned. Every child is different, so you will know what works the best for you.

    At this age, it's unlikely that your child is throwing a fit to be manipulative. More likely, he's having a meltdown in response to frustration. Toddlers are beginning to understand a lot more of the words they hear, yet their ability to produce language is so limited. When your child can't express how he feels or what he wants, frustration mounts.

    Remember that you're the adult. No matter how long the tantrum continues, don't give in to unreasonable demands or negotiate with your screaming toddler. It's especially tempting in public to cave in as a way of ending the episode. Try not to worry about what others think ó anyone who's a parent has been there before. By conceding, you'll only be teaching your child that throwing a fit is a good way to get what he wants, and setting the stage for future behavior problems. Besides, your child is already frightened by being out of control. The last thing he needs is to feel that you're not in control either.

    If your child's outburst escalates to the point where he's hitting people or pets, throwing things, or screaming nonstop, pick him up and carry him to a safe place, such as his bedroom. Tell him why he's there ("because you hit aunt x"), and let him know that you'll stay with him until his negative behavior stops. If you're in a public place ó a common breeding ground for tantrums ó be prepared to leave with your child until he calms down.

    Talk it over afterward. When the storm subsides, hold your child close and talk about what happened. Acknowledge his frustration, and help him put his feelings into words, saying something like, "You were very angry because your food wasn't the way you wanted it." Let him see that once he expresses himself in words, he'll get better results. Say with a smile, "I'm sorry I didn't understand you. Now that you're not screaming, I can find out what you want."

    Try to head off tantrum-inducing situations. Pay attention to what situations push your child's buttons and plan accordingly. If he falls apart when he's hungry, carry snacks with you. If he has trouble making a transition from one activity to the next, give him a gentle heads-up before a change. Alerting him to the fact that you're about to leave the playground or sit down to dinner ("We're going to eat when you and Daddy are done with your story") gives him a chance to adjust instead of react.

    Your toddler is grappling with independence, so offer him choices whenever possible. No one likes being told what to do all the time. Saying, "Would you like corn or carrots?" rather than "Eat your corn!" will give him a sense of control. Monitor how often you're saying "no." If you find you're rattling it off routinely, you're probably putting unnecessary stress on both of you. Try to ease up and choose your battles. Would it really wreck your schedule to spend an extra five minutes at the playground?

    Watch for signs of overstress. Although daily tantrums are a perfectly normal part of the mid-toddler years, you do need to keep an eye out for possible problems. Has there been upheaval in the family? An extremely busy or harried period? Tension between Mom and Dad? All of these can provoke tantrums. If after the age of 30 months your child is still having major tantrums every day, talk to your doctor. If your child is younger than 30 months and has three or four tantrums a day and isn't cooperating with any routines, such as getting dressed or picking up toys, you also may want to seek help. Your doctor can make sure your child has no serious physical or psychological problems and suggest ways to deal with the outbursts. Also, talk to your doctor if your child has frightening breath-holding spells when he gets upset.

  6. #6

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    DEAR Janvi!
    I understand that children should enjoy their child hood, but this is the age when they develop their habits( good or bad ). from this age you have to teach them about right or wrong other wise they will never learn.

    VJ!
    Your concern is absolutely right!
    you can teach him about this by giving examples of some good and bad children whom he knows. you can tell him that every body likes good boys who behave nicely and no one like to play or talk to the mannerless child.
    I hope he will soon understand the difference! (Y)

  7. #7

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    i do agree with u sonal bt first let me know ont thing dat can 2 year old baby distinguish the things between good or bad at such small age ... i know kids do starts learning from dis age bt i think if we will give them freedom to live in thier own way then they will never mislead form their good path nd if we makes boundaries for them den they will definately try to jump over it...



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